Log In | Sign Up   


 

    Academic Videos

J. Murray Gibson
Argonne National Lab
The Physics of the 'Blues': Music, Fourier and Wave-Particle Duality'
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures


  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3743 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:08:11
Send link to a friend



E. O. Wilson
Harvard University
Edward O. Wilson
on: Google Video
Edward O. Wilson is Pellegrino University Professor emeritus at Harvard. His awards include the National Medal of Science and two Pulitzer Prizes.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3741 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1 hour 7 min
Send link to a friend



Roderick MacKinnon

Interview
on:
Nobel Prize in 2003 for Structural and Mechanistic Studies of Ion Channels.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3627 votes)
Video format: real player       Time:
Send link to a friend



Wendy Sadler

Einstein made simple
on: sciencelive
What has relativity got to do with real life? How can you make time run slowly? Is Brownian motion any use to anyone? And what has the photoelectric effect done for the world at large? This 45 minute show celebrates 100 years since Einstein wrote his three most famous papers in 1905, and changed scientific thinking.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4949 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 19:07
Send link to a friend



Tom Roberts
Illinois Institute of Technology
Experimental Tests of Special Relativity
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures
Over the past century Special Relativity has become a cornerstone of modern physics, and its Lorentz invariance is a foundation of every current fundamental theory of physics. So it is crucial that it be thoroughly tested experimentally.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4059 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:05:20
Send link to a friend



Stephen Ashworth

Fun with Slime
on: sciencelive
Matt Cunningham is shown how to make slime by Stephen Ashworth from the UEA School of Chemical Sciences. The easy to follow receipe for slime is shown. We discover how we can measure slime's gloopiness and stickiness and how this helps us understand concepts such as molecular chains and viscosity.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3487 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 8:43
Send link to a friend



Michael von Korff
MacColl Institute for Healthcare Innovation
Part 4: self-management Support: Application to Depression Care
on: U. of Washington TV
Michael Von Korff identifies strategies providers can use to improve depression care using patient self-management support. This lecture was taped at the 2004 Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Clinical Research Methods Summer Session co-sponsored by the Seattle VA Epidemiologic Research and Information Center (ERIC) and the University of Washington.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5088 votes)
Video format: qt, wm       Time: 0:55
Send link to a friend



Richard Ernst

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Richard Ernst is the scientist who, more than anyone else, has shown how this weakness can be overcome, and in so doing has transformed the technique into arguably the most powerful tool that chemists now have at their disposal for structural analysis. The key breakthroughs were achieved by successfully developing a whole range of ingenious approaches- including powerful so-called '2-dimensional nmr' strategies.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4202 votes)
Video format: real player       Time: 56:11:00
Send link to a friend



Elizabeth Kessler
University of Chicago
Art and Hubble
on: Hubble Public Talks


  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3797 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:03:37
Send link to a friend



Peter C. Theisinger

The Mars Exploration Rover Project - How Spirit and Opportunity Got to Mars
on:
In January of this year, two golf-cart sized rovers landed on the planet Mars to seek evidence about whether the environment there might once have been capable of supporting life. Originally intended to last 90 days and rover 600 meters, these two Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, have far exceeded those expectations.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4166 votes)
Video format: windows media       Time:
Send link to a friend



Helen Llyod
Science Made Simple

on:
After an excellent lecture by Wendy Sadler from Science Made Simple, a company which communicates science in a simple a fun way, we chat to Helen Lloyd of Science Made Simple and recap some of the experiments used in the lecture. An excellent 15-minute introduction to some really cool science, accessible to everyone ... just be thankful you didn't have to clear up the studio afterwards! ;-)

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3710 votes)
Video format: Quicktime       Time: 13:00
Send link to a friend



National Science Foundation; N

Stormy Weather on the Sun?'- Science in Motion
on: National Science Foundation
A lively, informal look at solar research describes a worrisome new set of predictions for the upcoming sunspot cycle issued by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3978 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: :58
Send link to a friend



Gordon Moore
Intel
General Session Speaker, Gordon Moore. Seminar Day 2002
on: Caltech
In his talk, Moore examined the development of the powerful technology underlying the semi-conductor industry, and attempts to explain why, counter-intuitively, electronic equipment gets cheaper as it gets more complex.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3969 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 41 minutes
Send link to a friend



Harry A. Atwater, Jr.
California Institute of Technology Alumni College
High Efficiency Photovoltaics for Terawatt-Scale Renewable Energy: Think Potato Chip, Not Silicon Chip
on: Caltech
Photovoltaics (PV) technology is enjoying substantial growth and investment owing to worldwide sensitivity to the long-term importance of renewable energy. He discussed promising new approaches to ultrahigh-efficient, multi-junction solar cells with microphotonic optical components. (from Caltech Alumni College 2006)

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5072 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 76 minutes
Send link to a friend





Viking Mars Trailblazer
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Thirty years ago, the Viking mission arrived at Mars, giving us the first view from the surface of the red planet.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3513 votes)
Video format:       Time:
Send link to a friend



Bob White
University of Cambridge
Is it possible to be a scientist and religious?
on: sciencelive
Michael Marshall hosted a studio debate on the question 'Is it possible to be a scientist and religious?' He was joined by Dr Denis Alexander and Professor Bob White from the University of Cambridge, and Professor John Durant, head of the MIT Museum, all of whom combine careers in science with Christianity. They discussed whether science and religion contradict each other, whether they involve fundamentally different ways of thinking and why it is that they so often seem to be at each other's throats. The panellists dealt with Mike's questions very well, but he remains a devout atheist.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4533 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 31:49
Send link to a friend



Claire Donnahue

Jurassic Jellies
on: sciencelive
Claire is a geologist who came up with the idea of presenting geology through food because she finds children enjoy science much more when they can eat it! In this interview she shows Charlotte how to make an 'insect trapped in jelly' trifle and talks about amber and fossils.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3685 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 10:27
Send link to a friend



Edward O. Wilson
Harvard University
Interview
on: Slate
Edward O. Wilson is Pellegrino University Professor emeritus at Harvard. His awards include the National Medal of Science and two Pulitzer Prize

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3584 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1:00
Send link to a friend



Margret Thalwitz
World Bank
Seminar 9: Global Economy: Global Public Goods
on: World Bank
Global public goods are those resources and capacities with an impact that must be dealt with internationally. Because issues with global public goods often cannot be solved by a single country or entity, they require more cooperation and understanding to bring about a resolution.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3671 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 124 minutes
Send link to a friend



Pedro Mendes

Benchmarking parameter estimation and reverse engineering strategies
on: videolectures.net
Parameter estimation has become a central problem in systems biology, both in the form of calibration of bottom-up models or as a component of reverse engineering algorithms. With a proliferation of algorithms proposed for these purposes it has become important to compare them in objective ways. I will argue that in silico biochemical network models are extremely useful for this purpose. Several networks will be presented that are challenging tests for parameter estimation and network inference. An issue that arises from the use of in silico networks, though, is whether they can provide realistic data. The application of this benchmarking methodology will be illustrated with a comparison of four reverse engineering methods.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3808 votes)
Video format:       Time:
Send link to a friend



Barton Zweibach
MIT
String Theory for Pedestrians Part II
on: CERN
In this 3-lecture series I will discuss the basics of string theory, some physical applications, and the outlook for the future. I will begin with the main concepts of the classical theory and the application to the study of cosmic superstrings. Then I will turn to the quantum theory and discuss applications to the investigation of hadronic spectra and the recently discovered quark-gluon plasma. I will conclude with a sketch of string models of particle physics and showing some avenues that may lead to a complete formulation of string theory.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3921 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:17:14
Send link to a friend



Ian Evett

Logical forensic inference: Is the law an ass?
on: sciencelive
Ian Evett from the Forensic Science Service continues the 'Maths in Crime' lecture series with a look at the courts. When scientific evidence is presented to a jury, what statistics are given to allow them to assess the information, and what can those statistics say about the guilt or innocence of the accused? The handling of probability, particularly relating to scientific evidence, argues Ian, is a delicate issue not yet mastered in our judicial system.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3533 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 39:00
Send link to a friend



John Searle
UC Berkeley
Beyond Dualism
on: Google Video
Lecture 7 of 12 of IBM Research's Almaden Institute Conference on Cognitive Computing

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3173 votes)
Video format: Adobe Flash 9       Time: 1:17:34
Send link to a friend



Bruce Eisner

Eleusinian & Neo-Eleusinian Mysteries: The History & Future of LSD
on: Google Video
Bruce Eisner, The History and Future of LSD. The talk covers the history of LSD or lysergic-acide diethylamide tracing its origin in the organic compounds ergot said to be used in the Mysteries of Eleusius.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3675 votes)
Video format: Adobe Flash 9       Time: 1:55:55
Send link to a friend



Steven Van Sciver
Florida State University
Superfluid Helium from the Macroscopic to the Microsopic
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures


  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3490 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 56:50:00
Send link to a friend






The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

Speaker: Richard Feynman
Time: 50 minutes

Fifty minutes of PURE Feynman! This is the original Horizon Nova interview - essential for any Feynman fan... and for everyone else too!
THE PLEASURE OF FINDING THINGS OUT was filmed in 1981 and will delight and inspire anyone who would like to share something of the joys of scientific discovery. Feynman is a master storyteller, and his tales -- about childhood, Los Alamos, or how he won a Nobel Prize -- are a vivid and entertaining insight into the mind of a great scientist at work and play.
'The 1981 Feynman Horizon is the best science program I have ever seen. This is not just my opinion - it is also the opinion of many of the best scientists that I know who have seen the program... It should be mandatory viewing for all students whether they be science or arts students.' - Professor Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Prize for Chemistry

 



Warning: reset() [function.reset]: Passed variable is not an array or object in /home/content/s/a/m/sambogoch/html/navbar.php on line 118

Warning: Variable passed to each() is not an array or object in /home/content/s/a/m/sambogoch/html/navbar.php on line 119
Previous page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  Next page  
Copyright ©2007 Scitalks