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David Kutasov
University of Chicago
Little String Theory
on: Summer School on Strings, Gravity and Cosmology
Dr. David Kutasov presented a series of 3 lectures on Little String Theory at the PIMS Summer School on Strings, Gravity & and Cosmolology. When you get to the page, click on 'videos'.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:08:41
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Edward O. Wilson
Harvard University
Interview
on: Slate
Edward O. Wilson is Pellegrino University Professor emeritus at Harvard. His awards include the National Medal of Science and two Pulitzer Prize

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Video format: flv       Time: 1:00
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Murray Campbell

The History of Computer Chess: An AI Perspective
on:


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Video format: flash video / windows media       Time:
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Sally Baliunas
Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Monsters, Dwarfs, and Everything in Between
on: WGBH Forum
Inside the nucleus of an atom, the laws of quantum mechanics successfully describe the domain of the incredibly small. Yet the same laws influence the very large, including such objects as stars. Lowell Lecture #3.

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Video format: rm       Time: 55:56:00
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Richard Ernst

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Richard Ernst is the scientist who, more than anyone else, has shown how this weakness can be overcome, and in so doing has transformed the technique into arguably the most powerful tool that chemists now have at their disposal for structural analysis. The key breakthroughs were achieved by successfully developing a whole range of ingenious approaches- including powerful so-called '2-dimensional nmr' strategies.

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Video format: real player       Time: 56:11:00
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Roderick MacKinnon

Interview
on:
Nobel Prize in 2003 for Structural and Mechanistic Studies of Ion Channels.

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National Science Foundation; N

Stormy Weather on the Sun?'- Science in Motion
on: National Science Foundation
A lively, informal look at solar research describes a worrisome new set of predictions for the upcoming sunspot cycle issued by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: :58
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Edward Goldwyn

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Fred Sanger is often considered the father of modern biology, and is one of the few people to have been awarded two Nobel prizes. Working in Cambridge he developed a new chromatographic method fo determining amino-acid end-groups. His new chromatographic results on the free amino groups of insulin were published in 1945 and the complete sequence of insulin in 1955.

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Video format: real player       Time: 20:52
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Bruce Eisner

Eleusinian & Neo-Eleusinian Mysteries: The History & Future of LSD
on: Google Video
Bruce Eisner, The History and Future of LSD. The talk covers the history of LSD or lysergic-acide diethylamide tracing its origin in the organic compounds ergot said to be used in the Mysteries of Eleusius.

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Video format: Adobe Flash 9       Time: 1:55:55
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Kwabena Boahen
Stanford University
Neurogrid: Emulating a million neurons in the cortex
on: California Insitute for Telecommunications, the Science Network
Impressive project to model the human brain with a custom VLSI architecture that emulates neurons.

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Robbert Dijkgraaf
University of Amsterdam
Strings, Black Holes, and the End of Space and Time
on: Strings '05 Website
Professor Robbert Dijkgraaf

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Gerald Gabrielse
Harvard University
New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures
Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:11:20
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Keith Campbell
University of Nottingham
Cloning Dolly, How and Why?
on: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Keith Campbell, along with colleague Ian Wilmut of Roslin Institute, took biological science to a new level with the 1996 creation of Dolly the sheep. While prior success had been achieved with the births of sheep derived from cultured embryo cells, significant milestones in themselves, Dolly was special because she was the first animal to be cloned from a somatic, or body cell.

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Erwin Neher

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Nobel Prize in Medicine / Physiology 1991 together with Bert Sakmann 'for their discoveries concerning the function of single ion channels in cells'

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George Smoot
University of California, Berkeley
CMB, COBE and Cosmology
on: Nobelprize.org
George Smoot held his Nobel Lecture December 8, 2006, at Aula Magna, Stockholm University. He was presented by Professor Per Carlson, Chairman of the Nobel Committee for Physics.

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Video format: rm       Time: 45 minutes
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Flying Over Opportunity's Work Site
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Images of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region, taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, provided detailed, three-dimensional information that was used to create this animation of a hypothetical flyover. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reached the edge of this crater in September 2006 and began exploring its rim clockwise.

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Helen Czerski

Everyday Science: Wobbly World
on: sciencelive
We are surrounded by air molecules, jostling each other. Each time something moves, it exerts a push on that air around it and a compression wave travels out from that object. A continuous series of compressions is called a sound wave and the frequency of the compressions determines how it interacts with the world. The world around us is wobbling all the time but we can only detect vibrations of 20-20,000 Hz. However, this still lets us hear the shapes of things...

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Viking Mars Trailblazer
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Thirty years ago, the Viking mission arrived at Mars, giving us the first view from the surface of the red planet.

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Steven Pinker
Harvard University
Interview
on: Slate
Steven Pinker is Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University.

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J. Murray Gibson
Argonne National Lab
The Physics of the 'Blues': Music, Fourier and Wave-Particle Duality'
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures


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Roy Glauber
Harvard University
One Hundred Years of Light Quanta
on: Nobelprize.org
Roy J. Glauber held his Nobel Lecture December 8, 2005, at Aula Magna, Stockholm University.

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Ted Baltz
SLAC
Sloving the Dark Matter Problem
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures
Cosmological observations have firmly established that the majority of matter in the universe is of an unknown type, called 'dark matter'. A compelling hypothesis is that the dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range around 100 GeV. If the WIMP hypothesis is correct, such particles could be created and studied at accelerators. Furthermore they could be directly detected as the primary component of our galaxy. Solving the dark matter problem requires that the connection be made between the two. We describe some theoretical and experimental avenues that might lead to this connection.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:07:21
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Milena Anguelova
Chalmers University of Technology and Gothenburg University
Identifiability of Delay Parameters for Nonlinear Time-delay Systems with Applications in Systems Biology
on:
The concept of parameter identifiability will be introduced briefly, followed by a short description of how this property can be tested for ODE-systems in general by rank calculations. Then, the extension of this analysis to delay systems, recently developed by Xia et al. [1] and Zhang et al. [2] will be reviewed

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Charles M. Geschke

Adobe Systems - The Founders' Perspective
on:
Leading a publishing revolution...Adobe's success throughout the years is a result of a unique corporate culture, a balanced focus on the various company constituencies, and the development and promotion of products that were well ahead of the markets they addressed. As Adobe celebrates its 20th anniversary, co-founders John Warnock and Charles Geschke share their remarkable entrepreneurial experience discussing key philosophies and strategies that revolutionized desktop publishing.

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Harry Kroto
Florida State University
Astrophysics Lecture 3: The spectra of atoms and molecules in space
on: Vega Science Trust
The spectra of atoms and molecules in space: in nebulae, in the interstellar medium (ISM) , H 21cm radiation. The structure of our Milky Way Galaxy

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The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

Speaker: Richard Feynman
Time: 50 minutes

Fifty minutes of PURE Feynman! This is the original Horizon Nova interview - essential for any Feynman fan... and for everyone else too!
THE PLEASURE OF FINDING THINGS OUT was filmed in 1981 and will delight and inspire anyone who would like to share something of the joys of scientific discovery. Feynman is a master storyteller, and his tales -- about childhood, Los Alamos, or how he won a Nobel Prize -- are a vivid and entertaining insight into the mind of a great scientist at work and play.
'The 1981 Feynman Horizon is the best science program I have ever seen. This is not just my opinion - it is also the opinion of many of the best scientists that I know who have seen the program... It should be mandatory viewing for all students whether they be science or arts students.' - Professor Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Prize for Chemistry

 



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